Cleaning & Maintenance Management Online

Sustainability In The News

September 19, 2010

The 2010 College Sustainability Report Card

CAMBRIDGE, MA — More than 95 percent of participating institutions agreed to share the inner workings of their green practices, resulting in over 10,000 pages of detailed data and descriptions.

CAMBRIDGE, MA — Despite budget-breaking investment losses and widely fluctuating energy costs, many schools became greener during the last year, earning higher grades on the 2010 College Sustainability Report Card, according to a press release.

For the first time, the Sustainable Endowments Institute''s in-depth research on 332 colleges, including 1,100 sustainability survey responses, is available for public consumption, the release stated.

More than 95 percent of participating institutions agreed to share the inner workings of their green practices, resulting in over 10,000 pages of detailed data and descriptions, the release noted.

Mark Orlowski, executive director of the Sustainable Endowments Institute, said: "Surprising the skeptics, most schools we surveyed did not let financial reversals undermine their green commitments. New financial realities encouraged saving money by adopting environmentally friendly innovations. Colleges are now taking pride in greener campuses and sustainability-savvy investments — increasingly important concerns for parents and students in choosing a school. They can find the first comprehensive college sustainability selection tool at GreenReportCard.org."

Grading the schools entailed researching publicly available information, conducting surveys of appropriate school officials and assessing performance with 120 questions across 48 indicators in the following nine categories: Administration; climate change and energy; food and recycling; green building; transportation; student involvement; endowment transparency; shareholder engagement; and investment priorities, the release added.

Click here to read the complete release.


Sustainable Sports Stadiums

WASHINGTON — To date, 139 professional and college arenas and stadiums in the United States have applied for LEED certification.

WASHINGTON — Environmental sustainability is not simply for industrial buildings and corporate headquarters, a handful of sports stadiums have already met requirements or are hoping to achieve green certification, according to the Bleacher Report.

Medlar Field at Lubrano Park, home to the State College Spikes and the Penn State baseball Nittany Lions, was the first baseball stadium to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification; and TCF Bank Stadium, home to the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers, was the first football stadium to be LEED-certified, the story stated.

Even some of the more senior facilities have retrofitted green additions to their existing structures, continuing the trend of major sports leading by example in terms of environmental responsibility, the story noted.

According to the story, some of the sustainable aspects that help a stadium meet the criteria for LEED certification are: Waterless urinals and low-flow fixtures; grey water collection systems; recycling programs; energy efficient appliances and lighting; and localized material selection.

To date, 139 professional and college arenas and stadiums in the United States have applied for LEED certification, the story added.

Click here to read the complete article.


Kimberly-Clark Professional Launches Sustainability Campaign

DALLAS — Kimberly-Clark Professional looks at a bigger picture and strives to reduce environmental impact at every stage of a product''s lifecycle.

DALLAS — Kimberly-Clark Professional recently launched a sustainability campaign called "Reduce Today, Respect Tomorrow" that takes a bigger-picture approach to environmental sustainability and is the first truly global communications campaign developed by the company, according to a press release.

The central premise of the "Reduce Today, Respect Tomorrow" campaign is that focusing only on 100 percent recycled fiber content does not address the total picture, nor is it the best approach to environmental sustainability, the release stated.

Jan Spencer, president of Global Kimberly-Clark Professional, said: "Our ongoing efforts to achieve outstanding environmental performance are not just our responsibility as corporate citizens, they are vital to our success as a business. These efforts are also guided by global, company-wide objectives for improving operational performance in energy, water, waste, and environmental management systems."

According to the release, Kimberly-Clark Professional looks at a bigger picture and strives to reduce environmental impact at every stage of a product''s lifecycle.

Superior product performance that allows customers to use less and waste less is a key component of "Reduce Today, Respect Tomorrow" and Kimberly-Clark Professional''s business strategy for a more sustainable future, the release noted.

If less is consumed in the first place, it often means there is less packaging waste, which further reduces the amount of waste to recycle or send to landfill, the release added.

Click here to read the complete release.


The Institute Of Green Professionals Awards Sustainability Professionals

WESTON, FL — Adam Werbach, R. Nicholas Loope, Eric A. Woodroof, Mark W. McElroy and Dr. Diana Balmori all received the Honorary Fellow designation.

WESTON, FL — The Institute of Green Professionals (IGP) recently honored five individuals for their extraordinary, outstanding and meritorious contributions to the sustainability sphere, according to a press release.

The Honorary Fellow designation was awarded to: Adam Werbach, author of Strategy for Sustainability and global chief executive officer (CEO) of Saatchi & Saatchi; R. Nicholas Loope, a member of the Florida Association of Insurance Agents (FAIA) and principal of HL Design Build LLC; Eric A. Woodroof, Ph.D., chairman of the board of the Certified Carbon Reduction Manager Program and 2010 president-elect of the Association of Energy Engineers; Mark W. McElroy, Ph.D., director of research at the Center for Sustainability Performance at Deloitte Consulting LLP; and Dr. Diana Balmori, founding principal of Balmori Associates Inc. and design educator with the Yale School of Architecture and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, the release stated.

Today''s market demands both the specialist and the multidisciplinary, bigger picture expert who understands the roles of other experts such as architects, engineers, planners and everyone else in the sustainable development team, the release noted.

IGP President Grant W. Austin said: "The Institute is a global education and credentialing membership group for professionals and academics in sustainable development, specifically architects, engineers, land planners, landscape architects, appraisers, indoor air quality (IAQ) experts, corporate social responsibility (CSR) specialists, accountants and attorneys."

The (IGP) is a global education, research and credentialing membership organization for sustainable development professionals and academics, the release added.

Click here to read the complete release.


New Sustainability Coordinator Job Created

LAWRENCE, KS — The Sustainability Coordinator will be responsible for helping the city and county figure out how to save energy, reduce the community''s carbon footprint and look at green issues like locally produced foods.

LAWRENCE, KS — At a recent meeting of City Commissioners, the city of Lawrence formally agreed to create a new position to make the city greener: Sustainability Coordinator, according to the Lawrence Journal.

The new job, which the city of Lawrence will share with Douglas County, will draw a salary of about $60,000 per year, the story stated.

The Sustainability Coordinator will be responsible for helping the city and county figure out how to save energy, reduce the community''s carbon footprint and look at green issues like locally produced foods, the story noted.

According to the story, the city of Lawrence will pay for the first $100,000 worth of costs related to the program with a grant the city received as part of the federal stimulus program, and after the grant money is exhausted, Douglas County will pay for 60 percent of the position''s costs and the city will pay for 40 percent.

One of the first jobs for the new position will be administering a project to improve energy efficiency of the lighting and heating and air conditioning systems at the Lawrence Public Library, the story added.

Click here to read the complete article.