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CDC release

January 13, 2009
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ATLANTA — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) www.cdc.gov posted an immediate release on January 6, 2009, regarding health care worker infection control failures over the past decade. Health care personnel, working outside of hospital settings, have failed to follow basic infection control practices, causing 60,000 patients to be tested for Hepatitis B (HBV) and Hepatitis C (HBC) infection.
The CDC has been investigating health-care associated viral hepatitis outbreaks, over the past 10 years, and released their findings in the January 6th issue of the journal, Annals of Internal Medicine http://www.annals.org/
Because health care professionals continually refuse or simply neglect to follow basic infection control practices, patients have been and still are exposed to serious and fatal infections, like hepatitis.
The CDC revealed 450 people were identified as acquiring HBV or HCV infection because health care workers didn’t follow federally mandated infection control guidelines. Infection control practices are strictly mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) www.osha.gov. Patients are continually exposed to serious and deadly diseases because health care workers fail to follow these OSHAs basic infection control procedures.
The CDC’s report further identified the most common violations by health care professionals:
-Failure to wash hands
-Reuse of syringes
-Blood contamination of medication
-Blood contamination of equipment and devices
More and more patients in the United States receive their medical care outside of hospital settings. Doctors offices, clinics and outpatient surgery centers seem to be the most common places consumers are receiving medical care and treatment. JusticeNewsFlash.com (JNF) reported on the devastating outbreak of Hepatitis B and C infections, caused by the gross negligence of doctors and nurses in Nevada, in December 2008.
The failure of health care workers, at the Endoscopy Center of Southern Nevada, to follow basic infection control practices caused transmission of Hepatitis to many patients. The Nevada outbreak is considered by medical experts to be one of the worst in U.S. history. Health care professionals have a medical and legal responsibility to follow federal and state health care standards and guidelines.
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